Kitchen Re-Design Layout Options

July 7, 2018

 

Is your kitchen too small and too cluttered?  Do you need updated appliances, more counter space or more cabinets?  If you answered 'yes' to even one of these questions, you are ready to re-design your kitchen.  Start planning at the bottom – with the floor plan.  Whether you keep your current kitchen's layout, or want to reconfigure it to accommodate more workspace and storage, the layout of a kitchen is fundamental to it functioning well for your family's living style.  Here are some layout options to consider for your kitchen's renovation.

 

A Galley-Style Kitchen


A galley kitchen alternates appliances with counter space and storage, and has either two walls or one wall of cabinets across from an island, which serves as the opposite wall. 
Most restaurant kitchens are galley style – a long, narrow layout that utilizes limited space to maximize cooking efficiency.  Galley kitchens are popular because everything is nearby for the cook.  Unless the kitchen is quite long, this layout best accommodates one primary cook at a time.  It also offers little or no hangout space for family and friends.  If this is your layout of choice, be sure there is good lighting throughout the kitchen.

 

An L-Shaped (Corner) Kitchen
 

This kitchen usually has a wall of cabinets, plus a sink or range on a short, perpendicular wall.  This layout may provide less workspace, but is also an ideal shape for adding a kitchen island for more prep space, storage, and seating for family and guests.  An L-shaped kitchen is a good choice for a home with an open-concept floor plan, since it faces adjoining spaces like a dining area, living room or family room; and is a great option if you entertain frequently.

 

A U-Shaped Kitchen

 

This three-sided layout has become more popular as larger kitchens with more appliances, prep space and storage, are more desirable.  The U-shaped kitchen offers abundant counter tops, cabinetry on all three walls, and often includes an island with bar stool seating. The fact that this layout has only one open side usually cuts down dramatically on through traffic, which can be a distraction for those working in the kitchen.  An option for this layout is to convert one of the walls into a peninsula by removing the upper cabinets and adding a countertop.

 


A Single-Wall Kitchen

 

With this layout, all the appliances, cabinets, and counters are on one wall, with the sink between the refrigerator and the range.  This puts everything -- appliances, pots and pans and utensils – in close proximity to the cook.  However, it has limited counter space, and works for just one cook.  This layout is ideal for a portable kitchen island for more storage and counter space.  In addition, a single-wall kitchen can be improved by installing cabinetry that reaches the ceiling, and replacing its regular-sized appliances with smaller models

 

 

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